The scientific definition of ice is that it has a regular crystalline structure based on the molecule geometry of water, which consists of a single oxygen atom covalently bonded to two hydrogen atoms, or H-O-H. Normal ice has a hexagonal symmetry. However, it shows under polarized light a large variety of forms and colors. Even in samples of ‘normal’ crystalline ice it has diverse manifestations. Normal means ice is crystallized under atmospheric pressure and by temperatures below 0°C. 

Some samples are shown here. The photography’s are made of ice that was crystalized on microscope slides and placed in polarized light.

Published recently in a Science journal report : using quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy and super-resolution microscopy, the team generated a three-dimensional model of an “average” synapse, displaying 300,000 proteins in atomic detail. Watch it in HD and full screen mode for the best view.

Today huge news, the article I’ve worked a bit for is on the cover of Journal of Cell Biology.
Above, the cover picture : Quick-freeze, deep-etch transmission electron microscopy of myotube plasma membranes shows an abundance of large clathrin lattices (depicted in various pseudocolors) associated with branched actin filaments. Vassilopoulos et al. reveal that these clathrin plaques help to organize skeletal muscle sarcomeres and attach them to the muscle cell membrane.
Vassilopoulos S. et al. (2014) Actin scaffolding by clathrin heavy chain is required for skeletal muscle sarcomere organization. J Cell Biol, 205 (3):377

Today huge news, the article I’ve worked a bit for is on the cover of Journal of Cell Biology.

Above, the cover picture : Quick-freeze, deep-etch transmission electron microscopy of myotube plasma membranes shows an abundance of large clathrin lattices (depicted in various pseudocolors) associated with branched actin filaments. Vassilopoulos et al. reveal that these clathrin plaques help to organize skeletal muscle sarcomeres and attach them to the muscle cell membrane.

Vassilopoulos S. et al. (2014) Actin scaffolding by clathrin heavy chain is required for skeletal muscle sarcomere organization. J Cell Biol, 205 (3):377

Confocal images of growth factor–induced microvessel sprouts in collagen and fibrin. BS1 lectin-FITC (green) stains endothelial sprouts (white arrows); α-SMA-Cy3 (red) indicates supporting cells. DAPI-stained nuclei (blue). (a) VEGF-treated ring embedded in collagen. (b) bFGF-treated ring in fibrin. (c,d) PBS-treated control aortic rings in collagen and fibrin, respectively. All animals were wild-type C57BL/6 mice aged 8–12 weeks. Scale bar, 200 μm. Panel d of this figure was originally published under the Creative Commons Attribution License in ref. 12.
Marianne Baker et al. (2012) Use of the mouse aortic ring assay to study angiogenesis. Nature Protocols 7, 89–104 

Confocal images of growth factor–induced microvessel sprouts in collagen and fibrin. BS1 lectin-FITC (green) stains endothelial sprouts (white arrows); α-SMA-Cy3 (red) indicates supporting cells. DAPI-stained nuclei (blue). (a) VEGF-treated ring embedded in collagen. (b) bFGF-treated ring in fibrin. (c,d) PBS-treated control aortic rings in collagen and fibrin, respectively. All animals were wild-type C57BL/6 mice aged 8–12 weeks. Scale bar, 200 μm. Panel d of this figure was originally published under the Creative Commons Attribution License in ref. 12.

Marianne Baker et al. (2012) Use of the mouse aortic ring assay to study angiogenesis. Nature Protocols 7, 89–104